Showing results 1 - 12 of 40 for the month of January, 2011.

January 31, 2011

Cyrus Cylinder to remain in Iran until spring following loan extension

Posted at 2:25 pm in British Museum, Similar cases

More coverage of the decision by the British Museum to extend the loan of the Cyrus Cylinder to Iran.

The Art Newspaper

Cyrus Cylinder to remain in Iran until Spring
The extension gives people from the provinces the opportunity to visit the exhibition during the Persian New Year holidays
By Martin Bailey
Published online 5 Jan 11

The British Museum (BM) has agreed to extend the loan of the Cyrus Cylinder to Iran’s National Museum. Although it was due to be returned on 16 January, BM trustees took the unusual decision to offer a last-minute extension. As we predicted, it has now been accepted that the antiquity, an inscribed royal decree of 539 BC, can continue on loan to Tehran until 15 April, after the Iranian new year holidays.

A BM spokeswoman explained: “This decision has been taken in recognition of the fact that the exhibition has proved to be very popular. The extension will give an opportunity for people from the provinces, including school groups, to visit the exhibition during the No-Ruz (new year) holidays around 20 March.” So far the Cyrus Cylinder has been seen by over 200,000 visitors, who are allowed in to the gallery on a timed entry system to view the antiquity for a few minutes each.
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Eddie O’Hara takes up the fight for the return of the Parthenon Marbles to Athens

Posted at 1:58 pm in British Museum, Elgin Marbles, Marbles Reunited

Following taking over as the Chairman of the BCRPM, Eddie O’Hara talks to the BBC about why he believes that the Parthenon Marbles should be returned to Athens. Eddie O’Hara is also the Honorary President of the Marbles Reunited campaign.

BBC News

5 January 2011 Last updated at 13:59
Parthenon Marbles: Taking up the fight
By Trevor Timpson BBC News

Greek calls for the UK to return the Parthenon Marbles, nearly 200 years after they were removed from the Acropolis and shipped to London, have a new advocate leading the battle in the UK.

Former MP Eddie O’Hara, the new chairman of the British Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Marbles (BCRPM), has told the BBC News website he is optimistic the campaign for the British Museum to return the sculptures, also known as the Elgin Marbles, will succeed.
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What was achieved by the trial of former Getty curator Marion True in Italy?

Posted at 1:40 pm in Similar cases

Following on from the end of Marion True’s trial, it seems as though this is a case where the approach of direct legal action by Italy may have caused as many problems as it solved. Huge amounts were spent on a trial involving an institution that had been largely cooperative regarding the return of disputed artefacts in the past (bear in mind that this article is from the perspective of the Getty however – I think that this cooperation might not have seemed to apparent to the other parties that wanted artefacts returned that they knew were looted, yet didn’t have conclusive proof of this.

The Art Newspaper

“Neither condemned nor vindicated”
Marion True on why it is hard to accept the lack of verdict after her five-year trial
By Marion True | From issue 220, January 2011
Published online 5 Jan 11 (News)

The trial of Marion True, the former antiquities curator of the Getty Museum (which for many years has been one of the leading collectors of world-class antiquities), for conspiring to receive antiquities that had been illegally excavated and exported from Italy, began on 16 November 2005. The Art Newspaper has been covering the trial since its outset. Until March 2009, the prosecution worked through its case, and then the defence began cross-examining witnesses, but True has had no opportunity to present her case directly. Here, she tells The Art Newspaper about the trial and its outcome.

A headline in The Art Newspaper in June 2010 announced that the trial in Rome against me had “collapsed” after five years, the statutes of limitations for all crimes of which I was accused by the Italian state having expired. The court officially recognised this fact on 13 October in a hearing of 12 minutes. Thus, my five-year long trial ended without judgment—neither condemnation nor vindication, a reality hard to accept, given the distorted and slanderous allegations against me. Throughout, my lawyers advised me not to speak out, not to undermine my defence.
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January 28, 2011

British Museum agrees to extend Cyrus Cylinder loan to Iran

Posted at 2:05 pm in British Museum, Similar cases

Following requests from Iran, the British Museum has agreed to extend the loan of the Cyrus Cylinder for a further three months.

Bloomberg News

Iran to Keep British Museum’s Cyrus Cylinder Three More Months
By Farah Nayeri – Jan 4, 2011 6:55 PM GMT

The British Museum said it will prolong its loan to Iran of an ancient artifact for three more months, meeting a request by the Iranian authorities.

The Cyrus Cylinder, which went on show at the National Museum of Iran in September and was due back Jan. 16, will stay in Tehran until April 15 — after late March celebrations of the Iranian New Year (Norouz), the museum’s press office said in an e-mailed statement.
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Canadian birchbark canoe returned from estate in Penryn, Cornwall

Posted at 1:57 pm in Similar cases

A Canadian birchbark canoe dating to the eighteenth century, that was unexpectedly discovered in Cornwall will be returned to Canada. It is thought to be the oldest surviving example of its type. Unusually, the documentation from its acquisition is surprisingly clear & detailed, giving more information about the provenance of it.


Birchbark canoe from 18th century returning to Canada.
By Randy Boswell, Postmedia News December 27, 2010

It’s being described as the world’s oldest canoe, a one-of-a-kind relic from 18th-century Canada rediscovered in a storage shed in Britain and bound for repatriation to this country next year.

Earlier this month, the National Maritime Museum in Cornwall announced the “incredible find” at an estate in Penryn, England. Curators said the canoe – found in two pieces but remarkably well preserved given the passage of time – would be stabilized by conservators and exhibited in the U.K. before shipment overseas for permanent display at the Canadian Canoe Museum in Peterborough, Ont.
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January 27, 2011

Was the decision to cancel the Benin mask based on moral principles, or merely a tactical withdrawal?

Posted at 2:10 pm in Similar cases

Kwame Opoku reflects on the cancellation of the planned auction of a disputed Benin mask by Sotheby’s.

Modern Ghana

Author: Kwame Opoku, Dr.
Sun, 02 Jan 2011

The cancellation notice of the auction of Queen-Mother Idia mask on 4 December by Sotheby’s could not have been shorter:

“The Benin Ivory Pendant Mask and other items consigned by the descendants of Lionel Galway which Sotheby’s had announced for auction in February 2011 have been withdrawn from sale at the request of the consignors (2).
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Dimitrios Pantermalis – Monuments have rights in the same way as people

Posted at 1:54 pm in British Museum, Elgin Marbles, New Acropolis Museum

New Acropolis Museum president, Dimitrios Pantermalis, has given an interview with a Chinese newspaper, talking about the issues of reunifying disputed cultural artefacts. Interstingly, this follows not long after an interview by Greek Ministry of Culture Acting Deputy General Director of Antiquities and Cultural Heritage Maria Andreadaki-Vlazaki, also published in the Chinese media.


Monuments have rights like people: Greek museum president 2010-12-31 20:49:45
ATHENS, Dec. 31 (Xinhua)

Monuments have rights of their own to reunite just as humans do, a Greek professor says.

In an interview with Xinhua on Tuesday, Dimitris Pantermalis, president of the New Acropolis Museum, focused on the reunification issue of the Parthenon marbles.
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Sothebys cancels sale of looted Benin Oba mask

Posted at 1:46 pm in Similar cases

Following numerous complaints from private individuals about Sotheby’s sale of a mask looted from Benin, the item has now been removed from the auction.


Sotheby’s cancels sale of ‘looted’ Benin mask
Online protests halt auction of ‘plundered’ 16th-century artefact
By Rob Sharp, Arts Correspondent
Wednesday, 29 December 2010

Sotheby’s has scrapped its February sale of a controversial £4.5m mask believed to have been looted by British forces from 19th-century West Africa.

A number of private individuals contacted the auction house last week to complain about the sale of the 16th-century ivory mask, once thought to have belonged to an ancient Nigerian king. Local government officials in Nigeria have publicly condemned the sale and criticised the object’s current owners, the descendants of a former British government official involved in an 1897 British invasion of Benin, a city-state in what is now Nigeria.
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January 25, 2011

The Road to Nasiriyah – A film about the looting of Iraq’s archaeological sites

Posted at 2:06 pm in Similar cases

A documentary film is being produced, looking at the looting of Iraq’s archaeological sites after the country’s dictator was overthrown in 2003.

You can watch a trailer for the film here. log in as: Nasiriyah with the password: Journey Note that these are both case sensitive.

Four Corners Media

The Road to Nasiriyah
The Great Holiday Appeal

After four years of hard work on our documentary film from Iraq, The Road to Nasiriyah, we are nearing the end of the journey. We are happy to share with you that we are now at a one hour and forty eight minute rough cut, and plan to finish the film this spring.

To help us reach that goal, we are raising finishing funds in an end-of-year holiday appeal. We appreciate all of your support and encouragement that helped us get to this point.
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Iran asks for extension to Cyrus Cylinder loan

Posted at 2:00 pm in British Museum, Similar cases

Following the loan of the Cyrus Cylinder to Iran, requests have been made to extend the loan to allow the artefact to be on display for longer.


Islamic Republic asked Britain to keep Cyrus the Great Cylinder for a longer period; Iranian cultural figures called it a bad idea

LONDON, (CAIS) — CAIS was informed that the government of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has requested an extension of loan of the Cyrus the Great Cylinder. The Cyrus Cylinder was loaned to the National Museum of Iran in early September for a period of four months.

The extension of the loaning this priceless artefact is a matter of great concern, particularly when the Islamic Republic’s National Security and Foreign Policy Council voted in favour of completely cutting ties with the United Kingdom on Saturday.
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New museum in Cusco to house returned Peruvian Inca artefacts from Yale University

Posted at 1:54 pm in Similar cases

A new museum is being created in a manor house in Cusco to house the Inca artefacts that are being returned to Peru by Yale University. The artefacts will begin to be displayed in July 2011, marking the 100th anniversary of the discovery of the ancient citadel of Machu Picchu by explorer Hiram Bingham.


New Museum to House Inca Archaeological Pieces Returned By Yale University
By Stephen 16/12/2010 18:01:00

The Casa Concha, a manor house in the heart of Cusco, will house the archaeological pieces soon to be returned by Yale University

The objects will be on display from July 2011 which marks the 100th anniversary of Hiram Bingham’s scientific discovery of the Inca citadel.
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January 24, 2011

Sotheby’s to auction disputed “Oba” mask from Benin

Posted at 2:08 pm in Similar cases

Yet again, an item that’s ownership is disputed is coming up for sale through one of the large auction houses. Like the more well known Benin Bronzes, the artefact in this case originated from the African kingdom of Benin.

I should point out at this stage that I’m slightly behind with posting articles at the moment – and as a result, the outcome of this story has already been determined. I will post the later coverage of it in due course.

Financial Times

Sotheby’s to auction ‘Oba’ mask
By Susan Moore
Published: December 20 2010 02:02 | Last updated: December 20 2010 02:02

A 16th-century ivory pendant mask, one of the last great masterpieces of Benin sculpture remaining in private hands, is to be offered for sale at Sotheby’s London.

The mask, to be auctioned in February with an estimate of £3.5m-£4.5m ($5.4m-$6.9m), is thought to have been worn by the “Oba” or king of the west African city-state on ceremonial occasions. Only four other ivory masks of this age and quality are known, all of which are in museums.
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