Showing results 73 - 79 of 79 for the month of March, 2012.

March 14, 2012

Rioting & looting – then and now

Posted at 2:08 pm in Elgin Marbles, Similar cases

When the UK was beset by episodes of riots & looting in August 2011, parliament was (quite rightly) quick to condemn the actions of a small minority. It seems though that many of our museums are filled with artefacts acquired through episodes of similar behaviour – the only difference being that it took place in the past & in foreign countries.

On a similar note, some in the UK were quick to sit back smugly during the looting of Egypt’s museums, noting that it was fortunate that the UK had so many of their antiquities to protect them from such episodes. One wonders though, during bouts of lawlessness in the UK, whether the same people support the idea of shipping British artefacts abroad to safer places… permanently… with little chance of ever getting them back – and little choice in the matter?

From:
Guardian

UK riots: When is a looter a heroic entrepreneur?
Edward Lawrence
guardian.co.uk, Friday 19 August 2011 10.00 BST

Parliament denounced the 21st century Britons who looted their own high street, but 18th century looters who plundered distant nations to build the British Empire became heroes

The scenes of widespread mayhem and looting that were the main news items of the last week were profoundly shocking, and for me personally, a cause of deep anxiety. Because of my disability I felt vulnerable, which isn’t a sensation I exactly relish. It isn’t as if since my severe brain injury I have had a surfeit of good experiences.
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The problems of coin collecting

Posted at 1:58 pm in Uncategorized

My sympathy for the Ancient Coin Collectors Guild in the US is somewhat limited – they want some sort of exemption from, or change of the law regarding ownership of cultural property & seem to be regularly pushing articles to highlight their case.

From:
San Francisco Examiner

Another hobby it’s legally hazardous to pursue
By: Walter Olson | 08/17/11 6:00 PM
Special to The Examiner

Thomas Jefferson, John Quincy Adams and Ronald Reagan were among the many notable Americans who have enjoyed collecting ancient and historic coins.

Add to their number countless kids awestruck on their birthday when a grandparent presented them with a genuine coin from the Roman Empire to crown their treasure trove of more ordinary Liberty dimes and buffalo nickels.
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March 13, 2012

More information on WikiLoot – proposals to use social media / crowd sourcing to build a database of disputed artefacts

Posted at 6:34 pm in British Museum, Elgin Marbles, Greece Archaeology, Similar cases

Further information about the WikiLoot project, from the Author’s website. Remember to visit the proposal details on the Knight Foundation’s website & express your support for it, by “liking” or commenting on it.

From:
Chasing Aphrodite

Introducing WikiLoot: Your Chance to Fight the Illicit Antiquities Trade
Posted on March 12, 2012 | 3 Comments

Today we’re pleased to announce — and to seek your help with — an exciting new project we’ve been tinkering with in private for some time. We’re calling it WikiLoot.

The idea behind WikiLoot is simple:

1. Create an open source web platform, or wiki, for the publication and analysis of a unique archive of primary source records and photographs documenting the illicit trade in looted antiquities.

2. Use social media and other tools to engage a broad network of contributors — experts, journalists, researchers, dilettantes and curious citizens — to collaborate in the analysis of that material.
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WikiLoot – using the power of people to analyse the illicit trade in antiquities

Posted at 6:27 pm in British Museum, Elgin Marbles, Greece Archaeology, Similar cases

Jason Felch, one of the authors of Chasing Aphrodite, has submitted an application to the Knight Foundation, for assistance in creating WikiLoot – a website that would use crowd sourcing to create a database of looted artefacts in US museums.

Now – the suggestion is that it is only museums in the US, but others around the world are far from blameless in this issue & it ought to be easy to extend the remit of such a project to gradually include these too.

I think that the idea is an excellent one. I started trying to create a definitive list of artefacts disputes – just based on the articles I’ve posted on this site, but it is not a simple task – some cases have very little information available & each case is very different – so it is hard to come up with a simple way to categorise them all.

The key thing at this stage is to get funding for the project. In the words of the creator “One of the key things considered by judges is public engagement with the proposed idea. The best way to show this is for you to “like” our proposal or add a comment on how you think it could help — or be improved. (You may need to sign in with a Tumblr or other social media account.)” So, if this idea is of interest to you, make sure you go to the Knight Foundation page and “Like”, or ideally comment on the proposal. Remember also, to forward the details of the project to anyone else that you think may be interested in it, to try and get their support.

I look forward to being able to post further news about this project as it develops.

From:
Knight Foundation

WikiLoot: crowd-sourcing an analysis of the black market in looted antiquities

1. What do you propose to do? [20 words]
WikiLoot will identify looted antiquities in American museums by crowd-sourcing the analysis of a unique archive seized from black market dealers.

2. Is anyone doing something like this now and how is your project different? [30 words]
A handful of researchers around the world have access to parts of the archive. None have tried a crowd-sourcing approach to locating the thousands of looted objects shown in it.
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International colloquy in London on the reunification of the Parthenon Marbles

Posted at 2:11 pm in Elgin Marbles, Events

The British Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Marbles is organising (with the help of two other committees), a symposium in London to discuss the repatriation of the Elgin Marbles to Greece.

ADVANCE NOTICE – INTERNATIONAL COLLOQUY ON THE REUNIFICATION OF THE PARTHENON MARBLES
LONDON HELLENIC CENTRE, 19-20 JUNE 2012

This conference will be presented jointly by:

  • The British Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Marbles
  • The American Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Sculptures and
  • The International Organising Committee – Australia – for the Restitution of the Parthenon Marbles (inc).

It is timed to coincide with the anniversary of the opening of the Acropolis Museum (www.theacropolismuseum.gr) and the occasion of the London Olympics which will start one month later.
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The Manga, the Museum & the Marbles

Posted at 2:02 pm in British Museum, Elgin Marbles

The new Manga book about the British Museum (& also involving the Parthenon Marbles) has now been published in English.

From:
Guardian

The British Museum: marbles, murals… and manga!
Meet Professor Munakata, the crime-fighting archaeologist who saves one of London’s best-loved institutions from looters
Mike Pitts
Sunday 14 August 2011 19.59 BST

With its crumbling pillars and fading frescoes, the British Museum isn’t the first thing you’d associate with Japanese graphic novels. So it’s a slight surprise to learn that the museum will soon publish its own manga-based book.

Professor Munakata’s British Museum Adventure was serialised last year in Japan and has now been now translated into English. Its star – a portly ethnographer-cum-archaeologist who solves crimes and explains civilisations – is already well known to millions of Japanese readers, who follow his exploits in a series of Hoshino Yukinobu-penned comics. Hoshino’s work is blend of science fiction and thriller, layered with a rich mix of western and Asian myth and history.
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March 12, 2012

Questions raised over the Shellal Mosaic

Posted at 2:02 pm in Similar cases

Australian soldiers removed a mosaic dating from AD 561 from a ruined church near Gaza in 1917. Many questions continue to be raised about whether Australia should return this artefact, that they still have in their possession.

From:
Sydney Morning Herald

Questions raised over ‘looted’ mosaic
Andrew Taylor
August 14, 2011

IN 1917, a Byzantine mosaic created during the reign of Emperor Justinian was removed by Australian troops from the ruins of a church near Gaza. The Australians knew they were plundering the priceless antiquity during World War I, two authors now claim.

In a new book, authors Paul Daley, a Sun-Herald columnist, and Michael Bowers, raise questions about Australia’s continued possession of the mosaic, which has been in the Australian War Memorial collection since 1941.
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