Showing results 25 - 36 of 49 for the tag: BBC News.

November 29, 2011

The Lewis Chessmen visit Stornoway museum

Posted at 1:55 pm in British Museum, Similar cases

As part of their tour during which more of the collection is temporarily reunited, the Lewis Chessmen are now going on display in Stornoway – the closest that they have been to the location that they were first discovered.

From:
BBC News

15 April 2011 Last updated at 00:29
Lewis Chessmen exhibition opens in Stornoway museum

Some of the historic Lewis Chessmen have gone on display on the island where they were found more than 150 years ago.

More than 30 of the 12th Century pieces are being shown at the exhibition at Museum nan Eilean in Stornoway.
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November 17, 2011

Jordan tries to recover religious relics taken by Israeli bedouin

Posted at 1:54 pm in Similar cases

Some books, that may possibly form the earliest surviving Christian religious texts were found in a Jordanian cave, but were smuggled out of the country soon after their discovery. Jordan is now trying to secure their return.

From:
BBC News

29 March 2011 Last updated at 06:30
Jordan battles to regain ‘priceless’ Christian relics
By Robert Pigott BBC News religious affairs correspondent

They could be the earliest Christian writing in existence, surviving almost 2,000 years in a Jordanian cave. They could, just possibly, change our understanding of how Jesus was crucified and resurrected, and how Christianity was born.

A group of 70 or so “books”, each with between five and 15 lead leaves bound by lead rings, was apparently discovered in a remote arid valley in northern Jordan somewhere between 2005 and 2007.
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Peru welcomes back Inca artefacts

Posted at 1:47 pm in Similar cases

Following Peru’s agreement with Yale University, the first of the returned artefacts have now arrived in the country.

From:
BBC News

31 March 2011 Last updated at 00:56
Peru welcomes back Inca artefacts from Yale University

Peru has given a lavish welcome to hundreds of Inca artefacts returned by Yale University in the US, nearly a century after they were taken from the famed citadel of Machu Picchu.

A convoy of trucks escorted by police carried the remains from the airport to the presidential palace in Lima.
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November 10, 2011

Frome Hoard to remain in Somerset

Posted at 2:11 pm in Similar cases

In much the same way as with the Staffordshire Hoard, everyone thinks it is a great idea that the Frome Hoard should be displayed close to where it was found. The same principle however is deemed as less relevant with items such as the Parthenon Marbles.

From:
BBC News

21 March 2011 Last updated at 03:24
Frome Hoard of Roman coins to stay in Somerset

The largest ever collection of Roman coins found in Britain in one pot will stay in the county where it was unearthed.

The Museum of Somerset has raised £320,250 to keep the Frome Hoard. There had been fears it would go to London.
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March 13, 2011

The artefacts that are not on display at the British Museum

Posted at 4:02 pm in British Museum, Similar cases

Deaccessioning is a problematic topic for many museums – particularly those in the UK, where the law prohibits many of them from disposing of artefacts except in certain very specific circumstances. It is however, an issue that remains on the agenda – not least because whilst budgets of museums are cut, the size of their collections is ever increasing, yet much of it is never on public display. Institutions such as the British Museum hide behind the anti-deaccessioning clauses in their governing act of parliament, as a way of avoiding any sort of serious debate in many restitution cases. Surely though, there should be some more easy mechanism for downsizing vast collections, or loaning the items out on a more long term basis.

Many museums arguing that by keeping items in the public realm, they are serving an important educational purpose. It must be considered however, that if many of the items are not on display, the public is generally unaware of their existence (yet at the same time continues to pay for their storage & upkeep).

From:
BBC News

19 January 2011 Last updated at 06:30
London museums urged to show more ‘hidden’ artefacts

Museums in London are being urged to get more of their collections out of storage and on display as funding cuts will mean fewer landmark exhibitions.

Many museums in the capital keep more than 90% of their collections stored away.
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February 22, 2011

Export bans on important works of art

Posted at 1:56 pm in Similar cases

This case is not particularly unique – but once again, it highlights the importance that Britain sees in retaining its own artworks – whilst regularly decrying other countries trying to retrieve their artworks that have been acquired in the past by Britain. Either keeping it local is good, or not – playing it this way only when it suits, shows the double standards applied to the restitution arguments.

From:
BBC News

20 January 2011 Last updated at 10:59
Freed slave portrait saved from export

The first British portrait of a freed slave, which faced being lost to the nation, will remain in the UK for the next five years.

William Hoare’s painting of Ayuba Suleiman Diallo, also known as Job ben Solomon, was purchased by the Qatar Museums Authority (QMA) in 2009.
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February 14, 2011

Boy George returns looted Cypriot icon

Posted at 2:03 pm in Similar cases

The singer Boy George has returned an icon that was looted from a Cypriot church. He was not aware that the icon was looted until he was contacted by a Cypriot bishop who saw it in the background during an interview with the singer. The singer decided to return the icon once he found out, as he felt that it was the right thing to do.

Interestingly, he suggested that others should follow his lead and do the right thing – with the comment on twitter:

The Elgin Marbles next? http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2011/01/bishop_posyrios_and_an_icon.shtml

@BoyGeorge
Tue 18 Jan 19:41

You can see a picture of the bishop with the icon here.

From:
BBC News

19 January 2011 Last updated at 17:32
Boy George returns Christ icon to Cyprus church

Musician Boy George has agreed to return to the Church of Cyprus an icon of Christ that came into his possession 11 years after the Turkish invasion.

The former Culture Club singer bought the piece from a London art dealer in 1985 without knowing its origin.
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October 29, 2010

Benevento Missal returned to Italy by British Library under Holocaust (Stolen Art) Restitution Act

Posted at 1:15 pm in British Museum, Similar cases

As was speculated at the time of the law being passed, the Benevento Missal will be the first item to be officially returned under the Holocaust (Stolen Art) Restitution Act.

The points made originally about this particular return in relation to the law that allows it still stand. There is no evidence that the Missal was looted by the Nazis, or had any connection to the Holocaust. The law however allows its return, because of the time period in which it was removed from Italy. This highlights the piecemeal legislation implemented (when it is politically advantageous to do so) opening up holes in the anti-deaccessioning rules that govern the UK’s largest museums. The Human Tissue act before it opened up similar holes. The fact that holes need to be opened up for so-called special cases highlights the need for a full review of the legislation to cover all artefacts in museums in the UK, that they can be returned from collections when necessary.

From:
BBC News

15 September 2010 Last updated at 16:55
British Library returns manuscript looted during WWII

A 12th Century manuscript which was housed in the British Library is to be returned to Italy because it was looted during World War II.

The 290-page Beneventan Missal was taken from the Metropolitan Chapter of the Cathedral City of Benevento, Naples, in 1943.
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September 30, 2010

UK church returning historic church bells to Chile

Posted at 12:58 pm in Similar cases

What is interesting about this story is that they are returning the bells because they felt that it was the right thing to do. There was no obligation to do so & no excess of pressure was required to make them realise that the should be restored to the location where they belonged.

From:
BBC News

10 August 2010 Last updated at 07:50
Historic bells sent home to Chile from Swansea church

Three historic bells which were rung and later displayed in a Welsh church for almost 150 years are on their way home to Chile.

The bells were shipped from Santiago to Swansea, originally intended as scrap, when the Jesuit cathedral of La Campania burnt down in 1863.
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September 29, 2010

British Prime Minister’s statements on the Koh-i-Noor diamond

Posted at 8:29 pm in Similar cases

More coverage of David Cameron’s comments about why he felt that the Koh-i-Noor diamond should not be returned to India.

From:
NDTV

British PM David Cameron speaks to NDTV: Full transcript
NDTV Correspondent, Updated: July 29, 2010 14:46 IST

New Delhi: British Prime Minister David Cameron who is on a visit to India, spoke about UK’s relation with Pakistan, WikiLeaks, British economy and Kate Moss among others in an exclusive interview to NDTV’s Dr Prannoy Roy.

Here is the full transcript of the interview:
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June 12, 2010

France agrees to return Maori heads to New Zealand

Posted at 10:19 pm in Similar cases

In recent years, since the Human Tissue Act came into force, New Zealand has had numerous success in the return of artefacts involving human remains from the UK. Now it looks as though the restitution tide is also turning in France, with the agreement to return some Maori heads.

From:
BBC News

Page last updated at 00:21 GMT, Wednesday, 5 May 2010 01:21 UK
France votes to return Maori heads to New Zealand

The French parliament has voted to return the mummified heads of at least 15 Maori warriors to New Zealand.

The heads, taken by European explorers in the 18th and 19th centuries, are currently on display in several museums in France.
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October 20, 2003

Greek PM gets into trouble for asking Tony Blair for help with Elgin Marbles

Posted at 7:42 am in British Museum, Elgin Marbles

Greek Prime Minister Costas Simitis has sparked a media furore after his comments to Tony Blair about the Parthenon Marbles were overheard.

From:
BBC News

Last Updated: Saturday, 18 October, 2003, 05:35 GMT 06:35 UK
Greek PM in Elgin marbles upset

Greek Prime Minister Costas Simitis has sparked outrage among opposition parties after telling his British counterpart, Tony Blair, that returning the Elgin Marbles, could help his re-election bid.

The row broke out after Greek television stations aired a clip of Mr Simitis – apparently unaware of nearby cameras – talking to Mr Blair about the marbles at the sidelines of the European Union summit in Brussels on Thursday.
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