Showing 3 results for the tag: British Columbia.

February 2, 2011

Influence – a play about the arrival of the Elgin Marbles in Britain

Posted at 2:23 pm in Elgin Marbles, Events

A play on in Victoria, British Columbia, is set during the arrival of the Parthenon Marbles in Britain in 1817, when a young John Keats visits them for the first time.

Intrepid Theatre presents:
by Janet Munsil

March 4-5 & March 9-12, 8pm
Sunday Matinees + talkback: March 6 + 13, 2 pm
At the Metro Studio (Quadra at Johnson), Victoria BC
TICKETS $25: or call 250 590 6291

“A winner. . .I can’t wait for the day that Janet Munsil’s Influence will extend across the seas to be presented where it’s set, in London.” Vancouver Sun

Audiences in Victoria, BC will get a rare chance to see internationally renowned Victoria playwright Janet Munsil’s latest work, Influence, when the play makes its Victoria premiere at the Metro Studio in March.
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October 18, 2010

Canadian First Nations Haida ancestral reburial in British Columbia

Posted at 9:09 pm in Similar cases

The Haida in Canada have secured the return of ancestral remains from the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford, which will now be reburied. The handover of the human remains follows extensive negotiations that began in 1996.

QCI Observer

Reburial scheduled for Thursday
August 4, 2010 12:24 PM

A Haida ancestor whose remains have been in England for more than 100 years is on his way home.

The remains were collected by Reverend Charles Harrison from the Masset area and have been held in the Pitt Rivers Museum at Oxford University for many years. Rev. Harrison first came to the islands in 1882.
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March 26, 2003

Field Museum returns bones to islanders

Posted at 8:12 am in Similar cases

Chicago’s Field Museum is to return bones that were previously dug up from cemeteries on the Queen Charlotte Islands off the coast of British Columbia.

Chicago Sun Times

Field returning bones to native group
March 26, 2003

The Field Museum will return bones–mostly skulls–from about 160 native people who lived, logged and fished from islands off the coast of British Columbia.

The remains were dug up from cemeteries on the Queen Charlotte Islands and brought to Chicago in the early 1900s. Such returns represent one of the hottest international issues for museums.
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