Showing results 541 - 552 of 786 for the tag: Cultural Property.

October 30, 2010

A compelling reason why the Parthenon Sculptures should be reunified in Athens

Posted at 7:49 pm in British Museum, Elgin Marbles, New Acropolis Museum

There are many different reasons put forward for the restitution of the Elgin Marbles to Athens, most of which are strong enough to stand up as sufficient justification on their own, even if the other arguments were removed. In this case, it is the argument for presenting the sculptures in the context of the Parthenon itself that holds the most weight with Nick Thornsby.

From:
Nick Thornsby’s blog

Thoughts on the Parthenon Marbles
Posted on September 17, 2010

I’m in London today, because this morning I took part in a ‘bloggers’ interview’ with Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg. I’ll be blogging about that soon.

However no visit to London is complete without a visit to one of my favourite places – the British Museum. I particularly wanted to go today because a couple of months ago I was in Athens and visited the New Acropolis Museum, where most of the Parthenon marbles are displayed – many of the remaining marbles, of course, are displayed here in the British Museum.
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Will Iran claim ownership of the Cyrus Cylinder?

Posted at 1:13 pm in British Museum, Similar cases

The British Museum delayed the loan of the Cyrus Cylinder to Iran for a long time due to worries over the security of the loan & guarantees that the artefacts would be returned afterwards. After extensive re-assurances, the loan eventually went ahead. Many in Iran are still questioning whether it should be returned to the British Museum when the four months are up.

From:
Guardian

Iran lays claim to British Museum’s Cyrus Cylinder
Conservative Iranian newspaper raises concern that rare 6th century BC Babylonian artefact may not be returned
# Ian Black and Saeed Kamali Dehghan
Wednesday 15 September 2010 20.06 BST

It was not an easy decision for the British Museum to lend one of its most treasured artefacts to a country which has a notoriously prickly relationship with the UK. So curators in London are paying close attention to an Iranian threat not to return the famous Cyrus Cylinder — now embroiled in political intrigue in the Islamic Republic.

The 6th century BC Babylonian object, sometimes described as the world’s first human rights charter, arrived in Iran at the weekend and is due to be displayed for four months at the national museum.
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October 29, 2010

Benevento Missal returned to Italy by British Library under Holocaust (Stolen Art) Restitution Act

Posted at 1:15 pm in British Museum, Similar cases

As was speculated at the time of the law being passed, the Benevento Missal will be the first item to be officially returned under the Holocaust (Stolen Art) Restitution Act.

The points made originally about this particular return in relation to the law that allows it still stand. There is no evidence that the Missal was looted by the Nazis, or had any connection to the Holocaust. The law however allows its return, because of the time period in which it was removed from Italy. This highlights the piecemeal legislation implemented (when it is politically advantageous to do so) opening up holes in the anti-deaccessioning rules that govern the UK’s largest museums. The Human Tissue act before it opened up similar holes. The fact that holes need to be opened up for so-called special cases highlights the need for a full review of the legislation to cover all artefacts in museums in the UK, that they can be returned from collections when necessary.

From:
BBC News

15 September 2010 Last updated at 16:55
British Library returns manuscript looted during WWII

A 12th Century manuscript which was housed in the British Library is to be returned to Italy because it was looted during World War II.

The 290-page Beneventan Missal was taken from the Metropolitan Chapter of the Cathedral City of Benevento, Naples, in 1943.
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Iran wants to emphasise that the Cyrus Cylinder belongs to their country, not the British Museum

Posted at 12:54 pm in British Museum, Similar cases

Although it only has the Cyrus Cylinder on a short term loan, there are hopes in by some in Iran that it will be registered (by Iran) as an Iranian artefact, emphasising the fact that although it may not be kept in the country, it still belongs to them.

From:
Tehran Times

September 21, 2010
Iranian society calls for national registration of Cyrus Cylinder
Tehran Times Culture Desk

The Iranian Society of Architecture Luminaries has proposed that Iran register the Cyrus Cylinder on the National Cultural Heritage List.

“We should seize this opportunity caused by the arrival of the Cyrus Cylinder in the country to register it on the list,” society director Alireza Qahhari told the Persian service of the Mehr News Agency on Monday.
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October 28, 2010

The Parthenon Sculptures & the Battle of Ideas – who owns culture

Posted at 10:59 pm in British Museum, Elgin Marbles, Events, Similar cases

As part of the annual Battle of Ideas, a two day event organised by the Institute of Ideas, there is a debate about who owns culture, where the Elgin Marbles no doubt feature in the discussion. Geoff White from the Marbles Reunited campaign will be one of the speakers there.

From:
Battle of Ideas

Losing our marbles? Who owns culture?
Sunday 31 October, 12.30pm until 1.30pm, Courtyard Gallery Battle for the Past

The ownership of the Parthenon Marbles has been disputed since their removal from Athens in the early 19th century, by Lord Elgin. Some argue the sculptures belong in Greece, where they were carved almost two and a half thousand years go. Advocates of repatriation insist that the marbles are part of the heritage of Greece, and should never have been taken in the first place. Others feel that the marbles are now part of the history of the British Museum, and point out that in their current Bloomsbury home they can be seen in relation to other cultures, as part of world history. But with the opening of the new Acropolis Museum in Athens, a state-of-the-art centre, claims for their return are growing stronger.
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Why the Parthenon Marbles should now be returned to Greece

Posted at 1:16 pm in British Museum, Elgin Marbles, New Acropolis Museum

Many of the previous arguments that have been raised by the British Museum for their continuing retention of the Elgin Marbles have been invalidated since the opening of the New Acropolis Museum. They still refuse to acknowledge this fact though. Almost anyone who visits the new museum realises that it represents a far better place for displaying all the surviving sculptures withing site of the Acropolis, yet the British Museum continues to claim that the museum chances nothing.

From:
Brown Daily Herald

Anthony Badami ’11: Arguing against Elginism
By Anthony Badami
Opinions Columnist
Published: Thursday, September 16, 2010

The view of Athens from atop the Acropolis, more accurately known as the Citadel of Athens, is heart-stirring and breathtaking. The matrix of bleached-white stone which comprises the city below provides an impressive foreground, while the surrounding cerulean sea is pleasant and welcoming in comparison, a description proven even more appropriate as the city’s furthest points seem to submerge into the shimmering water. Eyeing the bay, it is as if you are watching a shower of minute diamonds drizzle into an undulating azure pool. All of these wondrous components taken together have the effect of rendering the scene cinema-like. It is truly a view worth seeking.

Unfortunately, much of the cultural and political accompaniments to this surreal scenery are either ruined or relocated or both. Through centuries of pillaging, theft, tribal conflict and religious warfare, a significant portion of Athenian classical art and architecture has been ransacked and stolen.
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October 25, 2010

UNESCO committee on cultural property meets in Paris

Posted at 12:58 pm in British Museum, Elgin Marbles

The Intergovernmental Committee for Promoting the Return of Cultural Property to its Countries of Origin or its Restitution in case of Illicit Appropriation (a part of UNESCO), meets in Paris. The Parthenon Marbles will be one of the topics that is on the agenda to be discussed. This is far from the first time that this committee has considered the issue of the Marbles & will no doubt not be the last. The British Museum however still seems to believe that the issue will go away if they ignore it for long enough, rather than trying to actually deal with it.

From:
United Nations

UN committee on return of cultural property meets in Paris
20 September 2010

The Parthenon Marbles will be among the cultural treasures under discussion this week as a United Nations committee promoting the return of cultural property to their countries of origin meets for three days in Paris.

Specifically, the Committee will consider the ongoing negotiations between Greece and the United Kingdom concerning the Parthenon Marbles, between Turkey and Germany on the Sphinx of Bogusköy, and the recent return of the Makonde Mask by a private Swiss museum to Tanzania.
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Cyrus Cylinder gets caught up in political arguments in Iran

Posted at 12:43 pm in British Museum, Similar cases

The arrival of the Cyrus Cylinder in Iran has triggered much debating over whether Cyrus the Great should hold relevance to the Islamic Republic at all, as it was produced before the Muslim religion existed. This seems to miss the point though of treating it for what it is – something that was significant at the time it was created, not using personal interpretations of it to try & score political points.

From:
Circle of Ancient Iranian Studies

Cyrus the Great caught up in a ‘punch and Judy’ political show in Iran
Monday, 20 September 2010 09:53

LONDON, (CAIS) — Islamic Republic’s conservative MP Ali Motahhari in an open letter has criticised Mahmoud Ahmadinejad for praising Cyrus the Great during a live televised interview on Friday.

The British Museum recently loaned the Cyrus Cylinder to the Islamic Republic for a period of four months, despite the international condemnations, protests and warnings regarding its safety. The priceless artefact was put on display at the National Museum of Iran and the Islamic Republic’s president formally opened the Cyrus Cylinder exhibit on Sunday 12th.
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October 24, 2010

Memorandum of Understanding for illegally exported Greek cultural objects entering the USA

Posted at 2:39 pm in Greece Archaeology, Similar cases

The Greek government is trying to create a Memorandum of Understanding with the US government to help prevent the looting of archaeological sites within Greece.

From:
SAFE

Advocacy
Say YES to Greece

The Hellenic Republic has requested a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) that would require documentation for cultural objects coming into the United States that may have been illegally exported from Greece. This request is a substantial step toward enabling the US Government to help stop the looting of archaeological sites and cultural monuments of Greece.
Those who are opposed to this agreement have already made their voices heard on the State Department website established for comment on the MoU. We at SAFE feel strongly that the best way to understand objects of Greek history is within their archaeological, architectural and historical contexts, scientifically examined and professionally preserved. We know we are not alone and urge anyone interested in supporting the MoU with the Hellenic Republic to go join us and Say YES to Greece.
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October 23, 2010

Lewis Chessmen – or Icelandic Chessmen?

Posted at 4:59 pm in British Museum, Similar cases

More coverage of the research that suggests that the Lewis Chessmen may have originally been carved in Iceland. The relevance of this is of course the fact that the British Museum likes to refer to them as Norwegian Chessmen (to avoid claims for return to Scotland), yet it is clear that nobody knows for certain where they are from originally – in the case of theses objects, their home (inasmuch as it plays a part in their history) has to be seen as the place they were discovered, not the place (now long forgotten) where they originated. Either way, the British Museum should see itself only as a temporarily custodian, rather than the rightful owner.

From:
Scotsman

Mum’s gone to Iceland for Lewis Chessmen
Published Date: 11 September 2010
By JOHN ROSS

BEHIND the great men, there could be a talented woman. Or at least that’s the latest theory about the origins of the iconic Lewis Chessmen.

The Lewis Chessmen, carved about 800 years ago mostly from walrus tusks, had previously been considered of Norwegian origin Picture: PA
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October 21, 2010

When will Yale University return Peru’s artefacts?

Posted at 9:19 pm in Similar cases

Three years ago, the government of Peru & Yale University signed an agreement for the return of various artefacts. At the time, it was seen by many as the sort of agreement that could act as a template for many other restitution cases around the world. The reality is though that three years later, not artefacts have yet returned from Yale.

From:
Patriot News

Who owns the past? Peru, Yale University are debating
Published: Saturday, August 28, 2010, 3:24 PM
HEATHER LONG, The Patriot-News

I returned this week from the South American nation of Peru, a country best known for its Inca ruins such as Machu Picchu.

As an American, I half-expected to get questions from Peruvians about Arizona’s new immigration law or better yet about William Trickett Smith, the Harrisburg-area native recently extradited to Peru for charges of killing his wife in the capital city of Lima.
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The Stone Henge megaliths have been stolen… Manga takes on the British Museum

Posted at 1:04 pm in British Museum, Elgin Marbles, Similar cases

In a story that has uncanny parallels to the (rejected) April 1st EDM by Andrew George MP in 2009, a Japanese Manga comic is serialising a story based on the repatriation of treasures from the British Museum – in exchange for other British artefacts that are held hostage.

From:
Economist

The professor to the rescue
A cartoon strip takes on the repatriation of treasures from the British Museum
Aug 26th 2010 | tokyo

“THE Stonehenge megaliths have been stolen!?” So exclaims Professor Munakata at the outset of a rollicking adventure set at the British Museum, in the form of a manga, or Japanese cartoon. Over the past five months, readers of Big Comic, a Japanese fortnightly magazine, have followed the exploits of the fictitious ethnographer as he gets embroiled in a bizarre plot to force the repatriation of the museum’s prized objects.

The strip, called “The Case Records of Professor Munakata”, was introduced 15 years ago by Yukinobu Hoshino, one of Japan’s most notable manga artists. Portly, bald and impeccably dressed with cap, cape and cane, the professor is Japan’s anti-Indiana Jones. He does not invite danger but bumbles into it. The strip does not follow any set formula but takes on serious issues.
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