Showing results 13 - 24 of 62 for the tag: Parthenon.

October 20, 2010

The Acropolis’s temple of Athena masquerading as the Norse Hall of the Slain

Posted at 9:52 am in Acropolis

As a building that has achieved an iconic level of fame, Greece’s Parthenon has been copied (both well & badly) in many different countries around the world. Most famous is the copy in Nashville, but there are others, such as the unfinished replica in Edinburgh & one in Germany known as the Valhalla, built by King Ludwig I.

From:
Irish Times

Friday, August 20, 2010
Heaven can wait but Valhalla here to stay

FINDING GERMANY: King Ludwig I’s temple thrusts one into the cold heart of Germany’s 19th-century hero cult, writes DEREK SCALLY

THE TEMPLE perched on the hill over the river Danube is a dead ringer for the Parthenon in Greece – only gleaming white and fully intact.
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August 24, 2010

Full moon late night opening at the Acropolis in Athens this evening

Posted at 12:45 pm in Acropolis, Greece Archaeology

Despite some earlier worries that it would be called off due to strikes, the planned August full moon late night opening of Archaeological sites in Greece is going ahead this evening (Tuesday 24th August).

This event has happened for a number of years now, with great success.

From:
Athens News Agency

08/24/2010
Archaeological sites open for August full moon

(ANA-MPA) — More than 90 archaeological sites around the country will remain open on Tuesday during the evening hours on the occasion of August’s full moon, the last of the summer.

The New Acropolis Museum, the Acropolis itself, the Cape Sounion site and the National Archaeological Museum in downtown Athens will remain open to the public, a more-or-less summer tradition over the past few years that was, nevertheless, threatened with cancellation this year to a disagreement between the relevant culture ministry and staff at the archaeological sites over extra pay.
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August 19, 2010

Mary Beard’s “The Parthenon”

Posted at 8:17 pm in Acropolis, British Museum, Elgin Marbles, Greece Archaeology, New Acropolis Museum

The new edition of Mary Beard’s Book – The Parthenon, has various changes, particularly in relation to the New Acropolis Museum which was still in the early stages of construction when the first edition was published.

From:
Lancashire Evening Post

Book review: The Parthenon by Mary Beard
By Pam Norfolk
Published on Fri May 28 15:07:23 BST 2010

Travellers have braved wars and bandits to see it, politicians and superstars have competed to be photographed in front of it and some of the world’s greatest artists and designers have been inspired by it…

The ancient Parthenon in Athens has been a centre of pilgrimage since it was built over 2,500 years ago and its stunning architectural beauty has never failed to disappoint the millions of visitors.
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A Parthenon free from scaffolding

Posted at 3:10 pm in Acropolis, Greece Archaeology

For thirty years, scaffolding has been a prominent feature of the Parthenon. The current stage that the restoration works have reached means that for a few months it will be possible for visitors to see the building unencumbered by scaffold.

From:
Reuters

Athens’ Parthenon scaffold-free for first time in years
By Jon Hemming
ATHENS | Thu May 27, 2010 9:45pm BST

ATHENS (Reuters Life!) – Visitors to Athens have a rare window of opportunity to see the showpiece Parthenon temple on the ancient Acropolis without scaffolding for the first time in nearly 30 years as a major restoration work nears completion.

The Greek government launched a project to restore the Parthenon and other buildings on the world heritage site in 1975, but it was not until 1983 that work started.
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May 24, 2010

Reinterpretation of the Parthenon Sculptures

Posted at 9:34 pm in Elgin Marbles

I came across this interesting re-interpretation of the Parthenon Frieze recently. Be sure to follow the link to the original post to see the images of the actual artwork.

From:
Designslinger

Sculpturally Alive

I hadn’t visited the blog, eternallycool, in awhile and found this stunning artwork in one of
their recent postings. Spanish photographer, Eugenio Recuenco, along with art director assistance by Eric Dover, and make-up artist Lewis Amarante, photographed live models and created his interpretation of Greek classical sculpture, inspired by the marble figures of the Parthenon.

We have included only a portion of the entire panel, but you’d have to agree that it is a
stunning reinterpretation of the sculpture found in the pediments and friezes of the Athenian temple. The tonal quality he has chosen and his use of chiaroscuro lighting effects, gives us the opportunity to look at the well-known marble figures with a new, dynamic perspective.
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New Zealand Parthenon replica to head to Athens

Posted at 9:22 pm in Acropolis, New Acropolis Museum

Victoria University School of Architecture in Wellington, New Zealand, has produced ten scale models of various aspects of the Parthenon. These are now being shipped to Athens for display in the New Acropolis Museum.

From:
Stuff (New Zealand)

Parthenon heads from Wellington to Athens
By MIKE WATSON – The Dominion Post

One of the world’s most recognisable buildings has been cut down to size by a Wellington architectural lecturer in models to be exhibited in Athens.

Ten models depicting sculptures and detailed sections of the Parthenon and Acropolis have been made by Victoria University School of Architecture and Design lecturer Jeni Mihova, and graduates Jordan Wisniewski and Matt Fraser.
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May 14, 2010

Parthenon frieze fragment returns to Palermo

Posted at 12:44 pm in Elgin Marbles, Similar cases

Although it was always agreed that the Parthenon Frieze fragment from Palermo was being loaned to Greece for a limited period, it was always hoped that this loan might be extended, or in some way made semi-permanent. Unfortunately it appears that this was not the case however.

One positive side to this though is it weakens one of the arguments from the British Museum for rejecting the possibility of loans to the New Acropolis Museum – That they only loan items that they expect to be safely returned at the end of the loan period.

Hopefully Italy will see the benefits of returning the fragment permanently at some point in the future.

From:
ANSA (Italy)

CULTURE: PARTHENON FRIEZE FRAGMENT RETURNS TO PALERMO

(ANSAmed) – PALERMO – A ship sailing from Naples has brought a fragment of the Parthenon’s frieze back from Athens where it has been on show since September 2008. The find had first been housed at the city’s old Museum of Archaeology, where it was visited by Italy’s President Giorgio Napolitano, before being transferred to the new Acropolis Museum. The art treasure, a piece of stone measuring 34 by 35 centimetres, is being kept in Palermo in a double strong box before being returned to the region’s ‘Antonino Salinas’ archaeological museum, where it has been an exhibit for over a century. The stone is a fragment of Phidias’ eastern frieze of the Parthenon and features a foot of Peitho, the Greek goddess of persuasion. The piece had been part of the collection of a British diplomat before it was donated by his widow to the University of Palermo in 1836; it then passed into the collection of Palermo’s National Museum when it was founded in the second half of the 19thcentury. The fragment will be on view when the Antonino Salinas Museum reopens. (ANSAmed).

March 18, 2010

Athens’s Acropolis on Google Earth

Posted at 1:57 pm in Acropolis

The Acropolis in Athens, along with the numerous buildings that occupy & surround the site are all now on Google Earth in 3D.

From:
Google Earth Blog

March 1, 2010
Athens goes 3D

With the Winter Olympics wrapping up, Google thought it’d be fun to revisit the site of the first modern Olympic games. They’ve added detailed 3D coverage to the city, with thousands of buildings now showing off sharp 3D models.

They provide a list of fun places to check out, such as the Parthenon and the Herodeion Theater.

You can also view a short video tour of the 3D city of Athens here.

January 20, 2010

A new edition of Mary Beard’s book “The Parthenon”

Posted at 2:10 pm in Acropolis, Elgin Marbles, Greece Archaeology, New Acropolis Museum

Anyone who read the first edition of Mary Beard’s book; The Parthenon, will be pleased to hear that a revised version of it is planned, which will take into account the fact that the New Acropolis Museum discussed in the first edition has now opened & is quite liked by the author.

From:
The Times Blogs

January 15, 2010
The “new” Parthenon, my new edition?

I wrote my little book on the Parthenon about a decade ago. It looked at the material of, and from, the temples in all its different locations — from the Acropolis itself to the diaspora of the Parthenon in London, Paris, Rome and Wurzburg and other places.

Things have changed a little since then. A small fragment of the Parthenon frieze (and I mean very small) has been sent “back” to Athens from Heidelberg (thanks, largely to a Greek then in the administration of the University of Heidelberg); another, slightly larger piece, has gone back from Palermo.
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A new website presents the Parthenon frieze

Posted at 2:01 pm in Acropolis, Elgin Marbles, Greece Archaeology

A new website (http://www.parthenonfrieze.gr) has created a virtual representation of the surviving frieze fragments of the frieze of the Parthenon in a way that is easily accessible for anyone to view.

From:
Cordis

2010-01-14
The Parthenon Frieze

The Parthenon Frieze is presented in a new website (http://www.parthenonfrieze.gr) which utilizes new technologies to present and elevate cultural content online. This new application, which was carried out by The Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Tourism in collaboration with the National Documentation Centre (EKT), is valuable for specialists and the general public alike.

The Parthenon Frieze, a unique work of art, is presented in a new website (http://www.parthenonfrieze.gr) which utilizes new technologies to present and elevate cultural content online. This new application, which was carried out by The Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Tourism (YSMA-Acropolis Restoration Service, Department of Information and Education) in collaboration with the National Documentation Centre (EKT), is valuable for specialists and the general public alike.
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October 27, 2009

The New Acropolis Museum presents the case for the reunification of the Elgin Marbles

Posted at 2:03 pm in Elgin Marbles, New Acropolis Museum

The Architectural Record argues that the New Acropolis Museum represents the most powerful case yet for the reunification of all the surviving Parthenon Sculptures in Athens.

From:
Architectural Record

New Acropolis Museum, Athens, Greece
Bernard Tschumi Architects presents a case for bringing the Elgin Marbles back to Athens in its design for the New Acropolis Museum.
By Suzanne Stephens

After all the controversy, lawsuits, and delays in building the New Acropolis Museum in Athens, it will no doubt seem churlish to point out that the $180 million museum, designed by Bernard Tschumi Architects, is not the firm’s most spectacular work. It lacks the lyrical grace of the stainless-steel-and-concrete Zenith concert hall in Rouen or the finesse of the shimmering, perforated-steel Vacheron Constantin headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, to name two. The dour mien of the New Acropolis Museum, with its sharp angles, black-fritted glass (except for a small section of the south wall), and less-than-perfect concrete work evokes High Modernist commercial American buildings of the 1970s.
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September 15, 2009

Become a fan of Elginism on Facebook

Posted at 8:13 pm in Elgin Marbles

There is now a fan page for Elginism on Facebook.

Obviously, this doesn’t mean that you are a fan of the concept of Elginism & encourage looting and destruction of ancient sites – more that you support the aims of this site and its attempts to publicise restitution claims, in particular that of the Elgin Marbles in the British Museum.

View the page and become a fan here.