Showing results 397 - 408 of 504 for the tag: Restitution.

May 14, 2009

Brighton and Hove City Council to meet with Aboriginals to discuss restitution request

Posted at 10:14 pm in Similar cases

Whilst there have been many successes in the campaigns for restitution of Aboriginal Australian artefacts, in some cases, there is less willingness to return pieces to their original owners.

From:
Sydney Morning Herald

UK council meets Aborigines over remains
May 16, 2009

Aboriginal leaders have met with British authorities to demand the return of a rare skull.

Brighton and Hove City Council previously ignored an agreement between the Australian and British governments and refused to return the skull because of its rarity.
Read the rest of this entry »

Colosseum fragment returned by tourists

Posted at 10:09 pm in Similar cases

The interesting aspect of this story is the fact that the general public seem willing to make entirely voluntary returns of fragments from ancient sites – they realise themselves that removing the pieces was the wrong thing to do. Unfortunately most museums seem reluctant to take similar actions without large amounts of coercion.

From:
BBC News

Page last updated at 14:22 GMT, Thursday, 7 May 2009 15:22 UK
Tourists return chip of Colosseum

Two US tourists who chipped off a piece of the Colosseum in Rome 25 years ago have returned it – along with an apology for taking it.

The fragment of stone, small enough to fit into a pocket, arrived in Italy in a package from California.
Read the rest of this entry »

National Museums Liverpool to return Aboriginal remains

Posted at 9:44 pm in Similar cases

More coverage of the most recent agreement by a British institution to return Aboriginal remains from its collection.

From:
BBC News

Page last updated at 13:56 GMT, Wednesday, 13 May 2009 14:56 UK
Museum returns Aboriginal remains

Members of an Aboriginal tribe held a ritual in front of Liverpool’s World Museum to mark the repatriation of human remains to Australia.

A skull is being returned to representatives of the Ngarrindjeri people because it has strong spiritual and religious significance.
Read the rest of this entry »

May 1, 2009

Museum in Britain returns 454 Egyptian artefacts

Posted at 1:01 pm in Similar cases

Various artefacts that are alleged to have been looted were returned to Egypt by a small museum in the UK. It is unclear from the article quite how they got there, how they were acquired without sufficient due diligence & why they are now being returned – it sets a good example to other museums though that actions should be taken to restore looted artefacts to their rightful owners.

From:
ArtInfo

British Museum Returns 454 Artifacts to Egypt
Published: May 1, 2009

CAIRO—Britain’s Myers Museum has returned 454 ancient artifacts to Egypt, according to Bloomberg.

The artifacts, which include beaded necklaces and bronze coins, had been removed from Egypt between 1972 and 1988, after antiquities trafficking was banned in 1970, said Hussein Al-Afuni, a head of Egypt’s Red Sea antiquities department, in a statement.
Read the rest of this entry »

April 24, 2009

James Cuno double bill

Posted at 12:58 pm in British Museum, Elgin Marbles, Similar cases

Now that James Cuno has contributed to two books trying to justify retention of cultural property, the New York Review of books has looked at both of these publications together.

From:
New York Review of Books

Volume 56, Number 8 · May 14, 2009
Who Should Own the World’s Antiquities?
By Hugh Eakin
Who Owns Antiquity? Museums and the Battle Over Our Ancient Heritage
by James Cuno

Princeton University Press, 228 pp., $24.95
Whose Culture? The Promise of Museums and the Debate Over Antiquities
edited by James Cuno
Princeton University Press, 220 pp.. $24.95

See the related article, The Affair of the Chinese Bronze Heads.

1.

Last June, the directors of the leading art museums of the United States agreed to limit their acquisitions of antiquities to works that have left their “country of probable modern discovery” before 1970, or that were exported legally after that date. On the face of it, the decision, issued by the Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD), did no more than update guidelines for ancient art—one of a number of such policy refinements by the association in recent years. In fact, however, it announced a tectonic shift in museum thinking about collecting art and artifacts of the distant past, a change that was unimaginable even five years ago.
Read the rest of this entry »

April 23, 2009

Looted treasures returned by Britain go on show

Posted at 12:46 pm in Similar cases

If stuff has been looted in recent times, it appears that it is imperative that it is returned to its rightful owners. Unfortunately, older cases are regularly brushed aside with the notion that we should accept their legitimacy (despite no clear reasons to do so). Where the situation warrants such measures, then any return of artefacts is to be welcomed. Consistency across all cases would be even better though.

From:
Daily Telegraph

Looted Afghan treasure to go on show
Afghan archaeological treasures thousands of years old are to go on display in Kabul after being rescued from smugglers passing through British airports.
By Ben Farmer in Kabul
Last Updated: 5:44PM BST 22 Apr 2009

More than 3,000 antiquities have been returned to Afghanistan after being confiscated by British customs officers and identified by the British Museum.

Situated at the crossroads of Asia and washed by centuries of trade, migration and invasion, Afghanistan has one of the richest archaeological heritages in the world.
Read the rest of this entry »

April 14, 2009

Tajik parliament approves restitution treaty

Posted at 1:00 pm in British Museum, Similar cases

Tajikistan’s government has approved a new bill in an attempt to aid them in various restitution cases where items of their heritage have ended up in foreign museums.

From:
Radio Free Europe

Tuesday, April 14, 2009
Tajik Parliament Approves Controversial Restitution Treaty

DUSHANBE — The Tajik parliament’s lower house has approved the CIS Treaty on Restitution, RFE/RL’s Tajik Service reports.

Deputy Culture Minister Mirali Dostiev told the parliament that ratification of the treaty would help bring back home all the artwork and historic valuables lost and stolen during the 1992-97 civil war in Tajikistan.
Read the rest of this entry »

April 2, 2009

Lindisfarne gospels return home temporarily

Posted at 12:55 pm in British Museum, Similar cases

The Lindisfarne Gospels are to return to North East England, but only on a temporary visit.

From:
News Post Leader (Newcastle upon Tyne)

Monday, 30th March 2009
Lindisfarne Gospels to make temporary visit to north east
29 March 2009
By ANTHONY McLEAN

THE Lindisfarne Gospels are to return to the north east of England, although only temporarily, it has been announced.
The British Library said the historic manuscripts, which were produced on the Northumberland island of Lindisfarne in the late 7th or early 8th century, could return to the region on loan for up to three months every seven years.

Campaigners from have long been fighting to bring the Gospels, which was drawn and illustrated to glorify the memory of St Cuthbert, back to the region permanently.
Read the rest of this entry »

April 1, 2009

The Early Day Motion that wasn’t

Posted at 10:15 pm in Elgin Marbles, Greece Archaeology, Marbles Reunited

Following being the first website to cover Andrew George’s Early Day motion on the Stonehenge megaliths in Greece, it appears that the motion could not be tabled because it did not meet the requirement to have a “reasonable factual basis”.

The press release from Andrew George’s office explains this in more detail.

ANDREW GEORGE MP
HOUSE OF COMMONS
LONDON SW1A 0AA

PRESS RELEASE
Wednesday 1st April 2009
For immediate release

COMMONS HAS SENSE OF HUMOUR BYPASS

Andrew George, MP for the West Cornwall and Isle of Scilly Constituency of St. Ives, has expressed disappointment that parliamentary rules disallowed his proposed Commons motion as tabled last night to be published this morning, Wednesday 1st April 2009. The motion read:
Read the rest of this entry »

Early Day Motion on the Stone Henge fragments in Greece

Posted at 12:17 am in Elgin Marbles, Greece Archaeology

The recent discovery of what are thought to be some of the missing megaliths from Stone Henge has been covered extensively in the Greek media during the last week. The stones were found at a site (the location of which is being kept secret whilst a full archaeological study is being carried out) in the Peloponnese. It is thought that they were taken from Britain during Roman times, whilst Greece was also part of the Roman Empire.

What has caused particular controversy in the UK, is the Greeks current refusal to consider returning these stones which are believed to have been an integral part of Britain’s most important historic monument.

Andrew George MP has today tabled an Early Day Motion to gauge the opinions of other MPs on the issue. Previous posts on EDMs explain the purpose of Early Day Motions in the House of Commons.

From:
Parliamentary Information Management Web Site

The Return of the Stonehenge Megaliths from Greece

That this House is euphoric about the news of the discovery of many of the missing megaliths from Stonehenge in a remote and mountainous area of the Peloponnese Peninsula in Greece to where they were taken to build an amphitheatre; considers this to be the single most important discovery in British archaeology for more than a century; yet is astounded at the brazen effrontery of the Greek authorities who have scandalously refused their return to Britain where they rightly belong; believes the Greeks have attempted to defend their decision with the kind of shameless and preposterous poppycock of an ancient colonial power; calls on the Greeks to put right the wrongs of their forefathers during that shameful period of ancient Greek imperial history; and asks HM Government on the day of the announcement of this find, April 1st 2009, to answer the extraordinary Greek claim that there is no difference between this and the holding by the British Museum of the Parthenon Marbles.

This follow-up article has more details.

March 25, 2009

Egypt wants Pharaoh’s coffin returned

Posted at 1:46 pm in Similar cases

Egypt is going to issue a formal request for the return of a Pharoanic coffin that it believes was illegally removed from the country 125 years ago.

From:
Gulfnews (UAE)

Egypt seeks return of pharaoh’s coffin from US
Bloomberg
Published: March 23, 2009, 23:04

Cairo: Egypt will make an official request to the United States within a couple of days for the return of a Pharoanic coffin that was smuggled out of the country 125 years ago, Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities said.

The North African nation is asking for the return of the wooden coffin, which is ornately painted with scenes and religious writing intended to help its occupant reach the afterlife, dating back 3,000 years to the 21st dynasty of the Pharaohs, the council’s chief Zahi Hawass said in a statement.
Read the rest of this entry »

March 10, 2009

YSL artefacts raise questions about art auctions

Posted at 12:31 pm in Similar cases

In an increasingly globalised economy, auction houses are finding themselves caught in the middle of disputes over cultural property.
This is not something that they can easily ignore though, as te disputes often involve countries as well as individuals – countries that these same auction houses also want to operate within.

From:
The Independent

Auctioneers ‘hit in China bronzes row’
By James Pomfret and Ben Blanchard, Reuters
Tuesday, 10 March 2009

The heated row over Christie’s sale of looted Chinese bronze animal heads in Paris is being closely watched by key art market players for possible signs of a broader fallout.

Since Christie’s ignored protests from Beijing and last month auctioned off a pair of bronze rat and rabbit heads which were stolen from the Old Summer Palace in 1860, Chinese authorities have slapped strict checks on all future imports and exports by Christie’s, making it potentially more difficult to source top relics.
Read the rest of this entry »