Showing results 37 - 46 of 46 for the tag: Turkey.

February 17, 2012

Two halves of “The Weary Herakles” to reunite

Posted at 1:42 pm in Similar cases

The two halves of “The Weary Heracles” are to be united again after thirty years. Many questions about the case still need to answered though.

From:
SAFE

Tuesday, July 19, 2011
Two halves of “The Weary Herakles” to reunite, but…

For those concerned about doing the right thing about cultural heritage, the case of the “Weary Herakles” has awaited resolution for the past three decades. Naturally, there is a sense of relief when Geoff Edgers reported that the statue will be “made whole” after all this time, referring to the apparent agreement to return the top part of the statue to Turkey and the rejoining of its two halves. Yet, many questions remain unanswered: When will it return to Turkey? Why now? What about other objects at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts? What about other museums?

This statue of Herakles (who leans wearily against his club after performing his Labors) is a textbook illustration of dubious provenance: ownership attributed to the dealer’s mother who got it from some other dealer before her, right from the start. But, “[t]he best evidence for pillage … is the fact that the upper half of the torso was unknown to the world before 1981,” wrote Roger Atwood in the book Stealing History.
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January 10, 2011

Cyprus’s attempts to reclaim artefacts looted from churches

Posted at 2:00 pm in Similar cases

Since 1974, many artefacts from Cypriot churches have appeared in auctions & private collections around the world. The Church of Cyprus is now increasing their efforts to secure the return of many of these items however.

From:
London Daily News

20 November, 2010 12:49 (GMT +00:00)
“Indiana Jones” search for stolen Cypriot icons across Europe
International News Desk

The Church of Cyprus has increased its efforts to search and repatriate stolen icons from the Mediterranean island with international observers describing the campaign as something resembling an “Indiana Jones” pursuit.

The Church of Cyprus has escalated its efforts across Europe to repatriate stolen byzantine artefacts from the northern third of the island which has been illegally occupied by the Turkish army since invasion of July 1974. It has long been the case that the Turkish troops and settlers have been selling important icons or religious artefacts to the open market, prompting the Church of Cyprus to start a campaign to find and repatriate them. This strategic goal among others has been undertaken by the Representation of the Church of Cyprus to the European Institutions, based in Brussels.
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February 10, 2010

Taking Turkey’s past

Posted at 1:54 pm in British Museum, Similar cases

Robbing the contents of tombs has been going on for as long as items of value have been enclosed in the tombs. Robbing the actual tombs themselves was not something that happened until the arrival of the English aristocracy in the nineteenth century.

From:
Today’s Zaman

[Digging up Turkey’s past] Tomb Raider: Charles Fellows in Lycia
27 January 2010, Wednesday
TERRY RICHARDSON ANTALYA

Robbing graves is a crime almost as old as the practice that unwittingly encouraged it — the burial of the dead with valuable objects. Gold death masks and other precious items proved too much of a temptation for unscrupulous “get rich quick” thieves in ancient Egypt, who tunneled their way into pyramid tombs in search of forbidden treasures.

Roman and Byzantine tombs were pillaged for their grave goods, and the “art” of grave robbing goes back over 2,000 years in China. Today, professional “tomb raiders” around the globe loot the burial places of past civilizations, from the graves of North American Indians to the tombs of ancient Chinese notables, and the international art market appears ever hungry for such antiquities, no matter how ill-gotten.
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May 26, 2009

Erdoğan to attend New Acropolis Museum opening

Posted at 5:43 pm in New Acropolis Museum, Similar cases

More coverage in Turkey of their Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s planned attendance at the opening of the New Acropolis Museum in June. Turkey has in the past also requested the return of numerous items held in the British Museum, so in many ways this is an area of common ground & belief for both countries.

From:
Today’s Zaman

Erdoğan, Davutoğlu to visit Greece
26 May 2009, Tuesday
MUSA TAŞPINAR ANKARA

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan will attend the inauguration ceremony of the new Acropolis Museum in Athens, which will take place on June 20, sources from the Prime Ministry said yesterday. Erdoğan is expected to have bilateral talks with his Greek counterpart, Costas Karamanlis, while in the Greek capital, the same sources noted.

Also next month, Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu will travel to the island of Corfu, Greece. Davutoğlu will participate in a two-day informal meeting of foreign ministers of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), which will focus on the OSCE’s role and security in Europe on June 27-28.
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May 12, 2009

Turkish Prime Minister to attend New Acropolis Museum opening

Posted at 12:27 pm in New Acropolis Museum

Turkey’s Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan will be among other world leaders attending the opening ceremony of the New Acropolis Museum on 20th June.

From:
Hurriyet (Turkey)

11/5/9
PM and FM to visit Greece

ATHENS – Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu will visit Greece on separate days in June, the Elefteros Tipos newspaper in Greece reported.

Erdoğan requested to attend the opening ceremony of the Acropolis Museum on June 20, the newspaper wrote, as a return for the visit of Greek Prime Minister Kostas Karamanlis in 2008. Davutoğlu will attend the foreign ministers’ summit of European Security and Cooperation Organization on June 28 to 29.

February 9, 2009

James Cuno on where art treasures belong

Posted at 7:13 pm in British Museum, Elgin Marbles, Similar cases

James Cuno may have other views as well as those on Encyclopaedic Museums – however, his views on that one subject seems to be his favourite topic at the moment, despite being widely discredited.

From:
Princeton University

James Cuno on “Where do the great treasures of ancient art belong?”
by James Cuno
Jan 27 2009

Two questions dominate our consideration of the fate of the world’s ancient heritage. The more vexing and urgent one — how can we prevent the looting of archaeological sites and the illicit trade in antiquities -– is not the topic of this article. The second one is.

“Where do the great treasures of ancient art belong? In Western museums or in countries where the civilizations that created them once flourished?”
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January 4, 2009

How smuggled Turkish artefacts fill foreign museums

Posted at 1:57 pm in Similar cases

Seeing the successes of other countries such as Egypt & Italy, in recent years, Turkey has become more vociferous in its requests for the return of artefacts by foreign institutions.

From:
Today’s Zaman

03 January 2009
Smuggled Turkish artifacts adorn world museums

A number of historical artifacts originally from Anatolia that were smuggled to foreign countries in the late 1800s and 1900s are now either exhibited in leading museums or auctioned.

The Culture and Tourism Ministry’s General Directorate on Cultural Assets and Museums notes that there are a number of historical works and artifacts smuggled from Turkey and currently based in other countries, including the US, Germany, Russia, Croatia, Denmark, Italy, France, Switzerland, Serbia, Montenegro, Ukraine and England.
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December 1, 2008

How did the Krater end up in the Met?

Posted at 2:02 pm in Similar cases

Sharon Waxman, author of Loot, looks at the Metropolitan Museum’s upcoming change of director & how the museum might handle future cultural property restitution claims.

From:
New York Times

Op-Ed Contributor
How Did That Vase Wind Up in the Metropolitan?
By SHARON WAXMAN
Published: December 1, 2008
Los Angeles

THE imminent arrival of Thomas Campbell as the director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art is much more than a simple changing of the guard after the long tenure of his predecessor, Philippe de Montebello. Mr. Campbell, who will take over one month from today, is a 46-year-old curator from the Met’s department of European sculpture and decorative arts, and he has a unique opportunity to shift the tone of an enduring and increasingly hostile debate in the world of art and museums: Who should own the treasures of antiquity?

Up to now, the parties on either side of this dispute have stood in opposing corners with their fingers in their ears. The governments of Italy and Turkey have filed lawsuits to force the return of plundered and looted artworks. Egypt has threatened to suspend excavation permits if iconic artifacts are not repatriated. Greece has built a new museum in Athens in large part to justify its renewed demands for the return of the Elgin Marbles from Britain.
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The battle over stolen treasures from the ancient world

Posted at 1:48 pm in British Museum, Elgin Marbles, Similar cases

Sharon Waxman’s new book seems now to have been reviewed in almost all the major news publications in the US – perhaps an indication of the current level of interest in the subject.

From:
San Francisco Chronicle

Nonfiction review: ‘Loot’ by Sharon Waxman
Reagan Upshaw, Special to The Chronicle
Saturday, November 29, 2008

Loot
The Battle Over the Stolen Treasures of the Ancient World
By Sharon Waxman
Times Books; 414 pages; $30

The title, stamped in gold capital letters on the dust jacket, gives away the author’s agenda: This is a muckraking book about art objects from ancient cultures that have found their way into major museums of Europe and the United States. Sharon Waxman has a nose for scandal and spends much of the book following up on reports of thefts by grave robbers, smuggling by dealers and sexual hanky-panky between museum personnel.
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October 23, 2008

Turkey wants Knidos Lion to be returned

Posted at 12:38 pm in British Museum, Similar cases

The town of Datça in Turkey is asking for the return of the Knidos Lion & a statue of Demeter, artefacts from the area currently in the British Museum. This request follows on from others that Turkey has made in the past for artefacts that have been taken from the countries ancient sites.

From:
Today’s Zaman
23 October 2008, Thursday

Datça to seek return of ancient sculptures
The town of Datça, in Muğla province, is planning to apply to the Ministry of Culture and Tourism for the return of a sculpture known as the “Knidos Lion” and a statue of Demeter. The pieces are currently being exhibited at the British Museum in London.

Speaking to the Anatolia news agency, the mayor of Datça, Erol Karakullukçu, said they want to take back the carvings, which were found in the ancient city of Knidos near Datça and that they will petition the Ministry of Culture and Tourism for their return. Karakullukçu said, “In order to keep the public aware that these sculptures were made in Datça thousands of years ago, and that they were taken to be exhibited in Britain, we made marble replicas of the original sculptures and exhibit them at the city park.”
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