Showing results 49 - 60 of 68 for the tag: USA.

January 26, 2012

What went wrong at the Getty Museum – the hunt for looted antiquities

Posted at 2:16 pm in Similar cases

The Trial (without result) of former Getty curator Marion True has been covered here many times before. The book “Chasing Aphrodite” aims to retell some of this story, as well as the background to it.

From:
New York Review of Books

What Went Wrong at the Getty
June 23, 2011
Hugh Eakin

Chasing Aphrodite: The Hunt for Looted Antiquities at the World’s Richest Museum
by Jason Felch and Ralph Frammolino
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 375 pp., $28.00

1.

On August 5, 70 BC, at 1:30 in the afternoon, a remarkable criminal trial began in Rome. A young prosecutor named Marcus Tullius Cicero was accusing a senior Roman political official, Gaius Verres, of extortion and misrule during Verres’s tenure as governor of Sicily. “For three long years he so thoroughly despoiled and pillaged the province that its restoration to its previous state is out of the question,” Cicero proclaimed in his bold opening statement.
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January 4, 2012

Chasing Aphrodite – event in Washington

Posted at 2:07 pm in Events, Similar cases

The authors of Chasing Aphrodite, Jason Felch and Ralph Frammolino are taking part in an event in Washington to discuss looted antiquities and transparency in American museums.

From:
National Press Club

Chasing Aphrodite: Investigative Journalists Track Down Looted Antiquities
January 24, 2012 6:00 PM

This is a ticketed event. Click here to jump to the ticket form.

Investigative journalists to analyze looted antiquities, and museum transparency

Jason Felch and Ralph Frammolino, investigative journalists and authors of “Chasing Aphrodite: The Hunt for Looted Antiquities at the World’s Richest Museum” will join Gary Vikan, director of the Walters Art Museum and Arthur Houghton, a former curator at the Getty Museum, to discuss looted antiquities and transparency in American museums at 6 p.m. Jan. 24 in the National Press Club ballroom.
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November 17, 2011

Peru welcomes back Inca artefacts

Posted at 1:47 pm in Similar cases

Following Peru’s agreement with Yale University, the first of the returned artefacts have now arrived in the country.

From:
BBC News

31 March 2011 Last updated at 00:56
Peru welcomes back Inca artefacts from Yale University

Peru has given a lavish welcome to hundreds of Inca artefacts returned by Yale University in the US, nearly a century after they were taken from the famed citadel of Machu Picchu.

A convoy of trucks escorted by police carried the remains from the airport to the presidential palace in Lima.
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April 25, 2011

Who owns the Silver coins lost on the Nuestra Señora de las Mercedes

Posted at 1:03 pm in Similar cases

Spain & the USA are battling over the ownership of coins found on a sunken Spanish Ship – although the original source of the coins was Peru.

From:
Independent

The battle for the ‘Mercedes’ millions
Could the WikiLeaks cables decide the fate of a $500m treasure discovered off the coast of Spain? Dale Fuchs reports
Tuesday, 8 February 2011

For 200 years, the silver coins settled silently into the Atlantic seabed, 3,000 feet beneath the waves. They gathered in clumps like rocks across a vast swath of ocean floor near southern Portugal, crusting over with sediment and weighing a total of 17 tonnes.

The coins were certainly of no use to the 250 sailors who carried them from Peru on what was probably the Spanish frigate Nuestra Señora de las Mercedes, which sank in 1804, torn apart by British cannon fire. But now, transported from their watery-yet-lucrative grave to litigious landlubbers, those 600,000 idle coins, reportedly worth up to $500 million, are working overtime.
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February 10, 2011

Should Egypt reclaim Cleopatra’s Needle be reclaimed from Central Park?

Posted at 1:45 pm in Similar cases

More coverage of the statements made by Egypt about reclaiming Cleopatra’s Needle, an ancient obelisk, from New York’s Central Park, due to allegations of negligence. Note that, although the obelisk is part of a pair (with the other in London), the claim only relates to the one in New York at present.

From:
Artinfo

Egypt Threatens to Reclaim Cleopatra’s Needle From Central Park, Citing Negligence
Published: January 10, 2011

CAIRO— Zahi Hawass, the ubiquitous, media-savvy Egyptian antiquities director whose blockbuster King Tut exhibition just finished its United States tour over the weekend, cannot be accused of resting on his laurels. After having convinced the Metropolitan Museum of Art to return 19 small artifacts that he said were taken illegally from Egypt, he’s now turning his sights to bigger game in the museum’s backyard — Cleopatra’s Needle, the 3,500-year-old obelisk that resides next to the Met in Central Park, and which Hawass now accuses the Parks Department of failing to properly maintain.

Despite its moniker, the obelisk was not built under the famous Egyptian queen’s reign, but by her predecessor of a century and a half, Thutmose III, around 1450 B.C. Its provenance is not in question — the Egyptian Khedive (or viceroy) first suggested giving it as a gift to New York City in 1869 in honor of the completion of the Suez Canal and the resulting trade relationship between the U.S. and Egypt. The gift became official in 1877, after William Vanderbilt promised the tens of thousands of dollars necessary for transporting the obelisk, and it was erected near the newly-established museum in 1881. But Hawass claims that the city has allowed the monument’s hieroglyphics to deteriorate, LiveScience reported.
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December 3, 2010

Nineteen Egyptian artefacts to be returned by New York’s Metropolitan Museum

Posted at 2:10 pm in Similar cases

Further coverage of the Met’s decision to return various artefacts to Egypt. Although the artefacts are all relatively small, it is still an important decision & acknowledges the growing realisation by museums that holding onto disputed artefacts is becoming increasing untenable.

From:
CNN

Met returning 19 King Tut objects to Egypt
By the CNN Wire Staff
November 10, 2010 8:24 p.m. EST

New York (CNN) — The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York is returning to Egypt 19 small objects that were entombed for centuries with ancient Egypt’s “boy king,” officials announced Wednesday.

A small bronze dog and a sphinx bracelet-element were attributed with certainty to Tutankhamun’s splendid burial chamber, which was discovered by Howard Carter in 1922 in the Valley of Kings, the museum and the Supreme Council of Antiques of Egypt said.
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November 16, 2010

USA to return smuggled sarcophagi to Egypt

Posted at 10:27 pm in Similar cases

Zahi Hawass has praised the US for being the first country in the world that co-operated with Egypt in securing the return of looted artefacts.

I’m a little unclear about which artefacts this news article is referring to – e.g. whether it is a case that has been covered elsewhere, as it gives very little in the way of detail & there was nothing mentioned on Zahi Hawass’s own website at the time this article was released by Associated Press.

From:
Art Daily

Egypt’s Chief Archaeologist Says United States to Return Smuggled Sarcophagi
14 October 2010

CAIRO (AP).- Egypt’s chief archaeologist says the United States will return a number of sarcophagi smuggled out of the country 50 years ago.

Zahi Hawass says U.S. authorities seized the sarcophagi on American soil and will return them to Egypt in the next two weeks. He didn’t provide any further details about the antiquities or say what sites they were taken from.
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October 24, 2010

Memorandum of Understanding for illegally exported Greek cultural objects entering the USA

Posted at 2:39 pm in Greece Archaeology, Similar cases

The Greek government is trying to create a Memorandum of Understanding with the US government to help prevent the looting of archaeological sites within Greece.

From:
SAFE

Advocacy
Say YES to Greece

The Hellenic Republic has requested a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) that would require documentation for cultural objects coming into the United States that may have been illegally exported from Greece. This request is a substantial step toward enabling the US Government to help stop the looting of archaeological sites and cultural monuments of Greece.
Those who are opposed to this agreement have already made their voices heard on the State Department website established for comment on the MoU. We at SAFE feel strongly that the best way to understand objects of Greek history is within their archaeological, architectural and historical contexts, scientifically examined and professionally preserved. We know we are not alone and urge anyone interested in supporting the MoU with the Hellenic Republic to go join us and Say YES to Greece.
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October 18, 2010

The ACCG & Extralegal Cultural Property Policy in the USA

Posted at 8:45 pm in Similar cases

The page linked to below has a link to download a lengthy paper about the application of the National Stolen Property Act to return cultural property to its country of origin. Reading through the document however, starts to reveal that it is aimed mainly at shoring up the position of the Ancient Coin Collectors Guild who are eager to argue that personal ownership (by its members) should over-ride normal legalities. This has been a long running saga, with large amounts of foot stomping in the hope that they can obtain special exemptions or get the US State Department to change its mind on the application of the various laws that are upsetting the ACCG.

Quite why the ACCG should be exempted from the law is entirely unclear to me. They seem to be carrying on the tradition of collecting for personal benefit at the potential detriment to others that ought to have died out at the end of the age of imperialism.

From:
Social Science Research Network

Unveiling the Executive Branch’s Extralegal Cultural Property Policy
Stephen Urice, University of Miami – School of Law
Andrew Adler, University of Miami

August 13, 2010
University of Miami Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2010-20

Abstract:
In this Article we reveal that the executive branch of the United States has consistently – and astonishingly – exceeded constraining legal authority with respect to the movement of cultural property into the United States. To illustrate this assertion, we identify three distinct categories of extralegal cultural property practices. First, we describe how the Department of Justice, misapplying the National Stolen Property Act, has obtained the return of cultural objects to their countries of origin by filing legally-deficient civil forfeiture complaints. Second, we describe how the Justice Department has pursued this same objective by proceeding under a legally-erroneous interpretation of the Archaeological Resources Protection Act. Third, we describe how the Department of State has repeatedly undermined the statutory structure and mandatory criteria of the Convention on Cultural Property Implementation Act, resulting in significant import restrictions on cultural property. All of these practices exceed constraining legal authority and lead to a similar result. Accordingly, we describe this pattern of practices as forming an extralegal cultural property policy. We express no opinion about the wisdom of this policy. Rather, our purposes in unveiling this policy are to promote a rigorous and transparent review of the executive’s practices and to restore the rule of law. In our conclusion we speculate as to why the executive has undertaken these practices and, among other observations, suggest with some sympathy that the current legal framework is outdated.

Working Paper Series

Date posted: August 15, 2010 ; Last revised: August 16, 2010

The full article can be downloaded from the link at the top of the page linked to above (marked one click download).

March 5, 2010

US to return smuggled coffin to Egypt

Posted at 2:04 pm in Similar cases

An ancient coffin smuggled into the US many years ago is now due to be returned to Egypt.

From:
Press TV

US to return smuggled Egyptian coffin
Tue, 23 Feb 2010 16:59:34 GMT

Egyptian Culture Minister Faruq Hosni says his country will reclaim a Pharaonic coffin smuggled into the US more than 125 years ago.

Egypt’s antiquities chief Zahi Hawass will receive the ornately painted coffin next month, Hosni said in a statement.
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July 13, 2009

Congresswoman Dina Titus congratulates Greece on the opening of the New Acropolis Museum

Posted at 12:46 pm in New Acropolis Museum

US Congresswoman Dina Titus has congratulated Greece on the opening of the New Acropolis Museum in Athens, after representing her country at its inauguration.

From:
Hellenic News of America

Titus Welcomes Greek Ambassador, Highlights Opening of Acropolis Museum

Washington, D.C. – Congresswoman Dina Titus of Nevada’s Third District and a member of the Congressional Hellenic Caucus spoke on the House floor this morning to welcome the new Ambassador of Greece to the United States and congratulate Greece on the opening of the Acropolis Museum. Below are her remarks as delivered. To watch her speech on the House floor, click here.

“I rise today to welcome the new ambassador from Greece to Washington. Ambassador Vassilis Kaskarelis has a long and distinguished diplomatic career, having represented Greece at the U.N., NATO, and the E.U., among other posts.
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June 7, 2009

New Acropolis Museum event in Washington

Posted at 9:26 pm in New Acropolis Museum

An event has been held in Washington to publicise the New Acropolis Museum, organised by the American Friends of the New Acropolis Museum.

From:
Athens News Agency

06/08/2009
Event for Acropolis Museum

WASHINGTON (ANA-MPA) — An event entitled “The Secrets of Parthenon” was held here to celebrate the opening of the New Acropolis Museum this month.

The event was co-organised by the organisation “American Friends of the New Acropolis Museum” as well as the National Museum of American History following an initiative of the Greek embassy in Washington.
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