Showing results 61 - 68 of 68 for the tag: USA.

May 25, 2009

Support in US Congress for return of Parthenon Marbles

Posted at 5:38 pm in Elgin Marbles

US Congressman Donald Payne has introduced a bill supporting the return of the Parthenon Marbles to Athens.

From:
Greek News Online

Community: Members of Congress Express Support for Greek Issues
Posted on Monday, May 25 @ 13:59:55 EDT by greek_news
Washington D.C., By Irene Zoupaniotis

Thirty four key Members of the U.S. House of Representatives and 10 key U.S. Senators participated and briefed the delegates of the 25th Annual Cyprus and Hellenic Leadership Conference. Most of the members of Congress expressed strong support to the communities concerns on Cyprus, the Macedonian issue and the Ecumenical Patriarchate. The list of the speakers included some of the most powerful congressional figures, suck as, Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL) who is the Senate Assistant Majority Leader, House Foreign Affairs Committee’s Chairman Howard Berman (D-CA), European Subcommittee’s Chairman Congressman Robert Wexler, Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), Chair, European Affairs Subcommittee, Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and others.
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January 10, 2009

Sharon Waxman talks about the ownership of ancient artefacts

Posted at 1:58 pm in Events, Similar cases

Author Sharon Waxman is giving a talk at the University of North Florida about who owns ancient treasures.

Waxman has recently generated a lot of interest in the issue with her book: Loot.

From:
The Florida Times-Union

Ownership of ancient treasures focus of talk
Western museums are facing a fight for many centuries-old objects.
* By Jessie-Lynne Kerr
* Story updated at 6:13 AM on Saturday, Jan. 10, 2009

The battle over who owns ancient treasures will be the subject of a lecture by author and award-winning journalist Sharon Waxman at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the University of North Florida’s University Center.

The event is sponsored by UNF and the World Affairs Council of Jacksonville.
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June 5, 2008

New antiquity collecting guidelines released

Posted at 12:42 pm in Similar cases

More coverage of the acquisition guidelines for US museums, brought in largely to try & avoid repeats of some of the court cases that have occurred in recent years. These are however still only guidelines, so museums are free to ignore them & they don’t apply retroactively.

From:
Artinfo

New Guidelines for Collecting Antiquities
By ARTINFO
Published: June 4, 2008

NEW YORK—After a year and a half of discussions, the Association of Art Museum Directors has announced new guidelines for collecting antiquities, reports the New York Times. The new policy uses 1970, the year UNESCO ratified a landmark convention prohibiting trade in illegal antiquities, as its starting point, saying a museum “normally should not” acquire a work unless it has solid proof that the object was outside of its country of probable modern discovery before 1970, or that the object was legally exported from its country of probable modern discovery after 1970.
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June 4, 2008

US Museums bring in stricter antiquity acquisition guidelines

Posted at 12:23 pm in Similar cases

Stricter guidelines have been announced by the Association of Art Museum Directors in the USA. These revised guidelines will not of course apply retrospectively to the huge numbers of acquisitions with which many institutions are filled that took place before these guidelines were implemented.

From:
New Yorks Times

Museums Set Stricter Guidelines for Acquiring Antiquities
By RANDY KENNEDY
Published: June 4, 2008

After a year and half of deliberations, the directors of the country’s largest art museums will announce new guidelines on Wednesday for how their institutions should collect antiquities, a volatile issue that has led in recent years to international cultural skirmishes and several highly publicized art restitution cases.

The Association of Art Museum Directors, whose 190 members also include leaders of Canadian and Mexican museums, says the new policy will probably make it even more difficult for museums to build antiquities collections through purchases or, as is more often the case, through gifts and bequests from wealthy private collectors. But they assert that the change will help stanch the flow of objects illegally dug up from archaeological sites or other places.
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May 30, 2008

Can Iran’s artefacts be siezed as terrorism compensation?

Posted at 10:39 pm in Similar cases

In a case that very similar to a previous one, moves are underway to seize Iranian artefacts on loan to the US to compensate for a terrorist attack in Beirut twenty five years ago. I still remain unclear about exactly how the law can be implemented in this specific way & whether its right that it should be.

From:
Reuters

US terrorism claimants compete for Iranian assets
Thu May 29, 2008 6:27pm EDT
By Andrew Stern

CHICAGO, May 29 (Reuters) – Families of those killed in the Beirut Marine barracks bombing 25 years ago staked their claim on Thursday to ancient Persian clay tablets, on loan to a U.S. museum, to satisfy a $2.7 billion judgment won against Iran.

Iran’s government, declared a state sponsor of terrorism by the United States for its support of militant groups such as Hezbollah and Hamas, has largely ignored civil suits seeking compensation for victims of Middle East attacks engineered by the two groups.
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October 26, 2003

Looted mummy of Ramses I returned to Egypt by Atlanta’s Michael Carlos Museum

Posted at 9:27 am in Similar cases

An Egyptian mummy taken from the country over 140 years ago, has been returned by the Michael Carlos Museum, after tests indicated that it was probably the body of Pharaoh Ramses I.

From:
BBC News

Last Updated: Sunday, 26 October, 2003, 14:44 GMT
Egypt’s ‘Ramses’ mummy returned

An ancient Egyptian mummy thought to be that of Pharaoh Ramses I has returned home after more than 140 years in North American museums.

The body was carried off the plane in Cairo in a box draped in Egypt’s flag.
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July 29, 2003

Differences in attitudes to artefact repatriation

Posted at 9:25 am in British Museum, Similar cases

Museums in the USA were founded on very different principles to many of those in Europe. Nowadays, this difference is starting to manifest itself in their more pragmatic approach to the restitution of disputed artefacts in their collections.

From:
Slate

Trading Places
Cultural property disputes are reshaping the art world—but how?
By Carol Kino
Posted Monday, July 28, 2003, at 12:25 PM PT

It’s a sad truth that the depredations of war and imperialism have sometimes had positive side effects for art history. Take the Metropolitan Museum’s recent “Manet-Velázquez” show, on the influence of 17th-century Spanish painting on 19th-century French art. For most of the 18th century, Spanish artists like Murillo, Zurbaran, and Velázquez were little known outside their homeland. Then in the early 1800s, hundreds of Spanish paintings arrived in Paris as Napoleonic war loot. Some were briefly shown at the Louvre before Napoleon’s defeat, after which they were returned. Later that century, French artists began adopting the Spanish artists’ realist aesthetic and loose, sensuous brushwork—a move that laid the foundations of Impressionism and radically changed the course of modern art.

Unlike many European museums, American museums were built with civic and capitalist muscle, rather than imperial might. Yet well into the 1970s their attitude toward acquisitions—as any expert will admit off the record—was frequently “don’t ask, don’t tell.” But today American courts are dealing with an unprecedented number of Holocaust reparation cases. And last year, the Justice Department successfully prosecuted a well-known New York dealer, Frederick Schultz, for conspiring to receive stolen Egyptian antiquities. As a result, some foreign collectors and museums have become more cautious about loaning work to museum shows—particularly those in America—and everyone has become vastly more diligent about conducting provenance research before buying.
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February 26, 2003

William G Stewart to tour USA lecturing about Elgin Marbles

Posted at 8:14 am in Elgin Marbles, Parthenon 2004

William G Stewart, a member of the Parthenon 2004 campaign is to tour the USA giving a series of lectures about the Parthenon Sculptures & why they should be returned to Greece.

From:
BBC News

Last Updated: Tuesday, 25 February, 2003, 16:44 GMT
Quiz host to lecture on Elgin Marbles

Fifteen-to-One presenter William G Stewart is to embark on a seven US city lecture tour on the return of the Elgin Marbles to Greece.

The quiz show host is a vociferous campaigner for the UK to return the artefacts to their country of origin and is an expert on their history.
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